MAPS (Mid America Paleontology Society), Sponsor of National Fossil Exposition

News & Events

Current News for 2017




National Fossil Expo 39

Sharpless Auctions Facility, IOWA CITY, IA

Dates & Topic for EXPO 2017



     The MAPS EXPO Show will be held March 31 - April 2, 2017, at the Sharpless Auction facility just north of I-80 at Exit 249. The Hotel Pre-Show is scheduled to occupy the Clarion Hotel north of I-80 at Exit 246 on North Dodge Street about 3 mi from Sharpless Auctions. Both venues are located in Iowa City, Iowa.

     

The theme for Expo 2017 will be the
Silurian Period
and the show will run from

Friday, March 31st to Sunday, April 2nd, 2017.

     
Schedule of events for Friday, March 31st, 2017:
Show hours: 8AM - 5PM


ADMISSION: The show and all events are free and open to the public, however donations are accepted. Children must be supervised.
SPECIAL EXHIBITS: Dimetrodon Skeleton courtesy of Prehistoric Planets
and U of I's MOBILE MUSEUM featuring exhibits on Iowa's geological and cultural history


OTHER ACTIVITIES:
Silent Auctions.
Children's Fossil Dig Box.


Workshop talks: All at the Sharpless Auctions Facility


11:45 a.m. Charles Newsom: 'Stump The Experts- Bring your fossils to ID'

If I can't identify it, I will find someone who can. I will also give general tips in IDing your material.


INFO ON CHARLES NEWSOM:
Charles Newsom is an Emeritus Faculty in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Iowa. He is also a Research Fellow with the Non-Vertebrate Paleontology Laboratory of the Jackson School of Geosciences at the University of Texas, an avid fossil collector and is currently living in central Texas. He is collaborating with several paleontologists on a number of paleontological studies.He is now volunteering at the "Berry Springs Park and Preserve" in Georgetown where he has created a series of nature web galleries (flowers, butterflies, mushrooms, dragonflies, etc) for the park. Charles-newsom@uiowa.edu


12:30 p.m. Tom Williams: 'Rudist Clams Rise and Fall'

One of the species that rose out of the mass extinctions were Rudist clams. Rudist clams took advantage of an opportunity to fill an environmental void left by extinct organisms and became extremely important reef building organisms. As Pangea separated and formed the Atlantic Ocean and the Tethys's sea, Rudists spread out quickly across these new coastlines as they formed - in some cases completely taking over entire areas. Rudist used an old tactic growing upward in a vase shape to gain an advantage over competitors. This upward growing strategy allowed some to become gigantic in size. However some of the same geologic events that allowed Rudists to become dominant would lead to their downfall. Again volcanics and other organisms would push Rudists into extinction at the end of the Mesozoic.


INFO ON TOM WILLIAMS:
Tom is a geology graduate of Western Illinois University and later received a Master of Science in Geohydrology at Illinois State. He has worked for 30 plus years as a geologist for Soil Testing Services Consultants, Illinois Environmental Protection Agency and as a part time instructor at Illinois State in Geologic Environmental Classes. He has contributed articles to several MAPS digests and is currently Show Chairman for EXPO. He has specialised mostly in collecting Crinoids in the Mississippian Chesterian age since 1980, contributing knowledge and some important specimens while collecting with other researchers. In 1998 he worked with Dennis Burdick on a major crinoid dig in the Chesterian of Alabama which uncovered many important specimens including whole plates up to five ft by five feet with some specimens having stems five to six feet long. A fossil trip with Paleoprospectors resulted in finding a thirty foot Tylosaur poriger in the Kansas chalk of Nebraska and a second trip two years ago yielded a Cretaceous fossil flowering plant that may be used for research. Paleotom234@comcast.net



1:45 p.m. John Catalani: 'Silurian Cephalopods'

We will begin with a brief overview of the Silurian Period, cephalopod classification, and nautiloid morphology. The program will concentrate on trends in nautiloid evolution during the Silurian and the possibility that a new group of cephalopods, the bactritids, evolved in the late Silurian. Many photos of fossil specimens will document the trends and evolution of cephalopods during the Silurian.


INFO ON JOHN CATALANI
John taught high school Earth Science for 32 years before retiring in 2004. From 1995 until it ceased publication in 2011, he authored the 'An Amateur’s Perspective' column for the newsletter magazine of the Paleontological Research Institution, American Paleontologist. John has several publications including one on Upper Mississippi Valley nautiloids and several with Robert Frey on Platteville Group Nautiloids. He has also presented many programs to clubs and at PaleoFest at the Burpee Museum in 2010. fossilnautiloid@aol.com;



3:00 p.m. Kent Smith - 'New York State During the Silurian Period.'


The Silurian Period is the shortest of the periods during the Paleozoic Era. During this relatively brief amount of time, New York State experienced three general distinct and diverse paleo-geographic settings: non-marine deltaic, deepwater marine and restricted hyper-saline. These three settings in-turn created unique environments in which aquatic life had to contend with. The general Paleography, Paleontology and Petrology of New York State during the Silurian will be presented.


INFO ON KENT SMITH
An interest in fossils and other earth science related subjects that began in high school, eventually evolved into a career, hobby and passion. He continues this enthusiasm in his 41st year of teaching Earth Science and an advanced geology elective at Hilton Central High School, near Rochester, NY. In the spring of 1991, Kent and Ray Meyer were instrumental in establishing what would later become the small group of fossil enthusiasts excavating Caleb Quarry in Middleport, NY. In 2009 and in 2015, he co-authored with Paul Chinnici, ”The Silurian Experience”. Both Editions are pictorial dedications to the fauna of the Rochester Shale found in Caleb Quarry. To share the treasures found at Caleb Quarry, Kent and Paul established Primitive Worlds in 1997. Since then, specimens have found their way to fossil enthusiasts all around the world. ksmith42@rochester.rr.com



The keynote presentation will take place at the Clarion Hotel (AKA The Highlander) at 6:00PM



The keynote speaker will be Dr. Carlton Brett - his keynote talk title is:


FOSSIL ECHINODERMS OF THE MIDDLE SILURIAN IN NORTH AMERICA: AN AGE OF CRINOIDS AND 'ANACHRONISTIC' FAUNAS


Detailed talk info:
The middle Silurian (late Telychian-early Sheinwoodian; 432 to 429 million year old) rocks in eastern North America feature rich and diverse echinoderm faunas, over a range of shallow shelf to deeper muddy ramp settings. These shallow, subtropical communities included representatives of more than 15 classes of echinoderms, dominated by crinoids, but also, in some cases, by more primitive stalked echinoderms that included some of the latest members of the rhombiferan and diploporitan cystoids, blastoid-like coronoids, and the youngest known paracrinoids and eocrinoids. Crinoids included members of all four Paleozoic subclasses and were represented by highly varied forms, including recumbent calceocrinids, weirdly coiled myelodactylids, flexibles with tendril-like arms, and long-stemmed camerates with pinnulate arms. Silurian echinoderms were adapted to a wide array of life modes, including active scavenging/predation in ophiuroids and asteroids (starfish), and attached passive suspension feeding , in edrioasteroids, blastozoans and crinoids. These stalked or pelmatozoan echinoderms were parts of tiered communities and fed from a variety of levels above the seafloor. Low-level forms including the edrioasteroids, calceocrinids and short-stalked "cystoids" suspension fed on abundant settling food particles using tube feet and mucous, just a few centimeters above the seafloor. Intermediate level forms, including many crinoids and the peculiar rhombiferan cystoid Caryocrinites, fed at levels of 10 to 30 cm above the bottom, while very long stemmed crinoids, like Dendrocrinus and Dimerocrinites took advantage of enhanced currents from 20 cm up to a meter above the bottom. Most pelmatozoans were permanently attached by direct cementation of the base of the theca (edrioasteroids, diploporitans) or by a holdfast comprising small cemented discoidal holdfasts, root-like radices, cemented "runners", or distal coils. A few crinoids had more flexible attachments formed by whorls of cirri that may have permitted adjustments in position. Silurian echinoderms were involved in symbiotic relationships with other organisms. Both camerate crinoids and the cystoid Caryocrinites hosted platyceratid gastropods that were commensals or possibly parasites. Certain crinoids and diploporitan cystoids hosted unknown organisms that were highly host specific and in some cases riddled their hosts with pits; some of the hosts also reacted to their parasites by secreting gall-like swellings. The middle Silurian marks a time of extensive change in echinoderms and other members of benthic invertebrate communities, associated with the global Ireviken event. In North America there was a major faunal turnover, associated with the immigration of formerly "Old World" forms, including the hemicosmitid rhombiferans (Caryocrinites), coronoids such as Stephanocrinus, and diploporitan cystoids. These organisms temporarily became important, even dominant members of some communities. The immigration of these forms may have been facilitated by fluctuating sea levels including the greatest highstands of the Silurian, which permitted influx of larvae across barriers. In addition, cooling climates, perhaps associated with high productivity and mass burial of organic matter, may have temporarily favored survival of "relict" groups derived from high latitude environments along the margin of the Gondwana supercontinent. These "anachronistic" faunas made a strong last stand in Laurentia during a few million years of the middle Silurian following their extinction elsewhere.



     Carlton E. Brett Bio:

     Professor Carlton E. Brett, PhD, earned his Ph.D. at the University of Michigan in 1978, and that year accepted a faculty position in Geology at the University of Rochester. He joined the University of Cincinnati Geology faculty in 1998 and in 2014 was awarded the title of University Distinguished Research Professor. Dr. Brett's research lies at the interface between paleontology and sedimentary geology. He is pursuing studies relating regional and global changes climate, sea level, and the carbon cycle to episodes of biotic change (bioevents) and extinction, as well as unusual sedimentary deposits, primarily in the middle Paleozoic.

     Carl also maintains active research interests in taphonomy (fossil preservation), paleoecology, especially the evolution of organism interactions such as predation, paleobiology of invertebrate animals, especially crinoids and trilobites, and cyclic stratigraphy.

     Carl is author or co-author of more than 250 scientific papers, 80 guidebooks, and five books. He was honored in 2010 with the University of Cincinnati's Rieveschl Award for research and has received numerous other honors, including an Alexander von Humboldt Research Prize in 2006, the 2008 Digby McClaren Medal for Lifetime Achievement in Stratigraphic Paleontology, the 2012 Raymond C. Moore Medal (Outstanding Paleontologist) from the Society of Sedimentary Geology, and the 2013 American Association of Petroleum Geologists Outstanding Educator Award.



Schedule of events for Saturday, April 1st, 2017:
Show hours: 8AM - 5PM


ADMISSION: The show and all events are free and open to the public, however donations are accepted. Children must be supervised.
SPECIAL EXHIBITS: Dimetrodon Skeleton courtesy of Prehistoric Planets
and U of I's MOBILE MUSEUM featuring exhibits on Iowa's geological and cultural history
OTHER ACTIVITIES:
Silent Auctions.
Children's Fossil Dig Box.

Workshop talks: All at the Sharpless Auctions Facility


9:15 a.m. John Moffitt: 'Paleogeography and the Silurian'

John will present Earth's Paleogeography during its last 3 galactic revolutions, during which time our planet circled the Sun over 600 million times and will place Silurian geography in perspective with Earth's very animated history. This presentation is fast and visual, so fasten your seat belt for a wild ride.


INFO ON JOHN MOFFITT:
John Moffitt is an Astrophysicist, Earth Scientist and Computer Scientist. He's worked in the oil business for over 45 years as a geologist, geophysicist, palaeontologist, petrophysicist, exploration manager and currently works with companies developing large hardware/software projects. A past International Director for Toastmasters, John's presented at conferences, universities and museums. Also a musician, cartoonist, and playwright; John leads paleontological field trips worldwide and writes frequently in the sciences. A long time volunteer at the Houston Museum of Natural Sciences, John was inducted into the National Rockhound Hall of Fame in 2002 for working with children in the Earth Sciences. jmoffitt.hou@gmail.com 713-478-4555;


10:30 a.m. Gerry Kloc: 'Silurian Trilobites from Missouri and Southern Illinois.'

There are many localities where Silurian trilobites are known. From Missouri and Southern Illinois, the literature is sparse on Silurian trilobites. There have been only 4 dalmanitid trilobites described from poorly preserved pygidia. The search for these described trilobites has resulted in many other trilobites that have not been reported from this area. Many of these trilobites will be shown, including some unusual ones.


INFO ON GERALD KLOC:
Gerry is employed by the University of Rochester in the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences as a Geological Technician. He is known for his fossil preparation, especially trilobites. Gerry has searched for trilobites that have not been reported and/or known species of poor quality. They are prepared and made available to researchers to publish. gjkloc@yahoo.com


11:45 a.m. Charles Newsom: 'Stump The Experts- Bring your fossils to ID'

If I can't identify it, I will find someone who can. I will also give general tips in IDing your material.


INFO ON CHARLES NEWSOM
Charles Newsom is an Emeritus Faculty in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Iowa. He is also a Research Fellow with the Non-Vertebrate Paleontology Laboratory of the Jackson School of Geosciences at the University of Texas, an avid fossil collector and is currently living in central Texas. He is collaborating with several paleontologists on a number of paleontological studies.He is now volunteering at the "Berry Springs Park and Preserve" in Georgetown where he has created a series of nature web galleries (flowers, butterflies, mushrooms, dragonflies, etc) for the park. Charles-newsom@uiowa.edu


12:30 p.m. Kyle McElroy: 'Engaging communities for Evolution Education'

Evolution is the foundation for our modern understanding of biology and is therefore critical to include in any biology curricula. However, less than 1/3 of American high school biology teachers present evolution according to standards, with the majority avoiding or handling it with 'caution'. Poor community support for teaching evolution is a strong motivator in avoiding the subject. The perception of science and scientists as outsiders is a likely factor alienating communities from science and a major hurdle to overcome. The Iowa City Science Booster Club is using a no-conflict approach to present knowledge through community engagement and local relevance. With compassion and fun activities we are bringing evolution to the people are Iowa and further as our organization expands.


INFO ON KYLE McELROY
Kyle is a Ph.D. candidate in the Biology Department at the University of Iowa and a member of Dr. Maurine Neiman’s lab. He studies evolutionary biology and focuses on the longstanding question of why so many species have sex to reproduce. In particular he focuses on how reproductive mode shapes genome evolution. Kyle has been engaging with the public about science through the National Center for Science Education’s program, the Iowa City Science Booster Club for the past two years. kyle-mcelroy@uiowa.edu


1:45 p.m. H.Paul Liu : 'New research achievements of the Winneshiek fauna and the Decorah Impact Structure'

Researches on the Middle Ordovician Winneshiek fauna and the Decorah Impact Structure are continuous. Recent achievements include the studies on conodonts, 'small carbonaceous fossils' (SCFs), Winneshiek Shale geochemistry analysis, and the comprehensive study on the impact structure. The research results and materials from the Winneshiek have also been widely used for public education, including the special exhibit in the University of Iowa’s mobile museum.


INFO ON H. PAUL LIU:
Paul is a geologist and research specialist of the Iowa Geological Survey, IIHR Hydroscience & Engineering, University of Iowa. He is one of the discoverers and the project leader of the unusual Winneshiek fossil fauna and the impact structure found in northeastern Iowa. Several journal articles on the discoveries have been published by him and his collaborators. huaibao-liu@uiowa.edu,


3:00 p.m. Don Johnson: 'Veggiesauruses Large & Small'

Learn about a variety of plant-eating dinosaurs during this program. How were the duck-billed dinosaurs like Edmontosaurus, Maiasaura, and Parasaurolophus specially adapted for chewing their food? How were the horns and spikes on dinosaurs like Triceratops, Styracosaurus, Ankylosaurus, and Pachycephalosaurus used? What evidence do we have for herding behavior among some kinds of plant-eating dinosaurs? What defenses did these dinosaurs have against predators? Did any of them provide care for their young? See and touch real fossil bones, teeth, claws, and even an egg from a number of different plant-eating dinosaurs. See some of the fossil bones of 'Laura, the Kid Duck-billed Dinosaur' (learn more at www.paleoproject.org). Examine dinosaur fossil replicas including duckbill skin, a Triceratops horn, and duckbill jaws. Bring your own questions to be answered about these many unique dinosaurs.


INFO ON DON 'FOSSIL GUY' JOHNSON
Don is an amateur paleontologist from Iowa City, IA with a special interest in fossil vertebrates. His collection of fossils and fossil replicas is one of the largest in Iowa, and he has experience collecting fossils in Iowa and other states out West. Using his self-given nickname 'The Fossil Guy', he has taught hundreds of educational programs using items from his collection. Don is President of the Eastern Iowa Paleontology Project (EIPP) – a non-profit with the purpose of establishing exhibits and promoting science education through the wonder of paleontology. He can be contacted at 319-213-1390 or donjohnson0511@gmail.com. To learn more about the EIPP, visit www.paleoproject.org.


5:15 p.m. LIVE AUCTION - OPEN TO THE PUBLIC:

Approximately 80 fossils and fossil-related items will be auctioned. Special Auction Item: Dinosaur Dig Trip, offered by Paleo Prospectors, to South Dakota, Wyoming or North Dakota for the summer of 2016. Minimum bid has yet to be determined. Keep almost everything you find (up to $4000). Pick from three week-long sessions in June or July. More information on the trip can be found at http://www.paleoprospectors.com. Proxy bids may be emailed to EXPO chair Tom Williams: paleotom234@comcast.net.

Proceeds from the auction are used to support paleontology scholarships.







Sunday, April 2:
Schedule of events for Sunday, April 2nd, 2017:
Show hours: 8AM - 3PM (limited dealers)


ADMISSION: The show and all events are free and open to the public, however donations are accepted. Children must be supervised.
SPECIAL EXHIBITS: Dimetrodon Skeleton courtesy of Prehistoric Planets
and U of I's MOBILE MUSEUM featuring exhibits on Iowa's geological and cultural history
OTHER ACTIVITIES:
Silent Auctions.
Children's Fossil Dig Box.

Workshop talk:

1:00 p.m. Bill Desmarais: 'Track'em down and Dig'em up'

Alberta, Canada is a known hot bed of dinosaur discoveries and fossils. Come on this virtual expedition and find thousands of dinosaur tracks and trackways uncovered in a large coal mine in the Canadian Rockies. The expedition continues with discoveries of multiple Albertosaurus skeletons in the badlands of the Red Deer River that hint at the pack hunting nature of large tyrannosaurs. There will be interactive parts where you will be able to apply your paleontologist skills and observe real dinosaur fossils and footprints. Children are welcome.


INFO ON BILL DESMARAIS
Bill Desmarais was a high school science teacher in Iowa for 36 years before his retirement in 2007. He taught biology, earth sciences, and Advanced Placement Environmental Science at Washington High School in Cedar Rapids. Since 1982 he has had the good fortune to work with Dr. Phil Currie of the University of Alberta at Edmonton and Pete Larson of the Black Hills Institute, Hill City, South Dakota at several dinosaur quarries in South Dakota, Wyoming and several locations in Alberta, Canada. Bill is a member of the Iowa Academy of Science and the Cedar Valley Rock and Minerals Society, as well as the Mid-America Paleontological Society. Desmarais_3@msn.com




     The MAPS EXPO Show will be held March 31 - April 2, 2017, at the Sharpless Auction facility just north of I-80 at Exit 249. The Hotel Pre-Show is scheduled to occupy the Clarion Hotel north of I-80 at Exit 246 on North Dodge Street about 3 mi from Sharpless Auctions. Both venues are located in Iowa City, Iowa.

Jan-March 2017 MAPS Newsletter Now Available


     
Click on the link below - no password required!

Jan-March 2017 MAPS Newsletter




EXPO 2017 Informational Newsletter Now Available


     
Click on the link below - no password required!

MAPS EXPO 2017 Informational Newsletter

Other Recent Newsletters Available Below



     
Click on the link(s) below - no password required!

May-Aug 2016 Newsletter

May-Aug 2016 Newsletter

Jan-Mar 2016 Newsletter

MAPS Expo 2016 information


Sept-Nov 2015 MAPS Digest Newsletter

May-Aug 2015 MAPS Digest Newsletter

Jan-Mar 2015 MAPS Digest Newsletter

MAPS EXPO 2015 Info Digest Newsletter


Previous News/Events for 2017




MAPS Club Meeting Saturday, February 11, 2017



     The February MAPS (Mid-America Paleontology Society) meeting will be held in Room 125 of Trowbridge Hall at the University of Iowa on February 11, 2017.

Cornell visiting professor Kelsey Feser will present the program:

'How shell accumulations reveal recent changes in coastal marine environments.' at 1:00 p.m.

The regular MAPS business meeting will be at 2:00 p.m.

Click here to view previous years' archived news.