MAPS (Mid America Paleontology Society), Sponsor of National Fossil Exposition

News & Events

Current News for 2018




National Fossil Expo 40

Sharpless Auctions Facility, IOWA CITY, IA

Dates & Topic for EXPO 2018



     The MAPS EXPO Show will be held April 6-8, 2018, at the Sharpless Auction facility just north of I-80 at Exit 249. The Hotel Pre-Show is scheduled to occupy the Clarion Hotel north of I-80 at Exit 246 on North Dodge Street about 3 mi from Sharpless Auctions. Both venues are located in Iowa City, Iowa.

     

The theme for Expo 2018 will be the
Permian and Triassic Periods
and the show will run from

Friday, April 6th to Sunday, April 8th, 2018.

     

Schedule of events for Friday, April 6th, 2018:
Show hours: 8AM - 5PM


ADMISSION: The show and all events are free and open to the public, however donations are accepted. Children must be supervised.
SPECIAL EXHIBITS: 'Scorpy's Story' - the discovery of Pentecopteris decorahensis, a giant eurypterid from Winneshiek County, Iowa, featuring a life-size, 6-foot long model of the oldest-known sea scorpion and world's first big predator!



OTHER ACTIVITIES:
Silent Auctions.
Children's Fossil Dig Box.
Workshop talks: All at the Sharpless Auctions Facility



11:45 a.m. Charles Newsom: 'Stump The Experts- Bring your fossils to ID'

If I can't identify it, I will find someone who can. I will also give general tips in IDing your material.


INFO ON CHARLES NEWSOM:
Charles Newsom is an Emeritus Faculty in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Iowa. He is also a Research Fellow with the Non-Vertebrate Paleontology Laboratory of the Jackson School of Geosciences at the University of Texas, an avid fossil collector and is currently living in central Texas. He is collaborating with several paleontologists on a number of paleontological studies.He is now volunteering at the "Berry Springs Park and Preserve" in Georgetown where he has created a series of nature web galleries (flowers, butterflies, mushrooms, dragonflies, etc) for the park. Charles-newsom@uiowa.edu





12:30 p.m. Tom Williams: 'Crinoids of the Muschelkalk Chalk'
The Triassic began as the break-up of Pangea created a lot of violence along the volcanic rift that today is the mid ocean ridge in the Atlantic The formation of the single supercontinent Pangea caused the single greatest extinction with at least 90 percent possibly 95 percent of all life on earth destroyed. Muschelkalk is German - 'Muschel' or shell and 'kalk' is limestone, so Muschelkalk is shell limestone which occurred during the Middle Triassic. Deposits of the Muschelkalk are present from the French Massif Central to the Russian platform east to west. There is a presence of deposits into the North Sea and south into what is today southern Germany. The Germanic basin created from the breakup of Pangea created an opportunity for crinoids to expand creating a unique relationship of crinoids in the shell banks present in the Germanic basin. This gave rise to potentially the most advanced crinoid of its time: Encrinus liliiformis.


INFO ON TOM WILLIAMS:

Tom is a geology graduate of Western Illinois University and later received a Master of Science in Geohydrology at Illinois State. He has worked for 30 plus years as a geologist for Soil Testing Services Consultants, Illinois Environmental Protection Agency and as a part time instructor at Illinois State in Geologic Environmental Classes. He has contributed articles to several MAPS digests and is currently Show Chairman for EXPO. He has specialised mostly in collecting Crinoids in the Mississippian Chesterian age since 1980, contributing knowledge and some important specimens while collecting with other researchers. In 1998 he worked with Dennis Burdick on a major crinoid dig in the Chesterian of Alabama which uncovered many important specimens including whole plates up to five ft by five feet with some specimens having stems five to six feet long. A fossil trip with Paleoprospectors resulted in finding a thirty foot Tylosaur poriger in the Kansas chalk of Nebraska and a second trip two years ago yielded a Cretaceous fossil flowering plant that may be used for research. Paleotom234@comcast.net




1:45 p.m. John Catalani: 'Mesozoic Nautiloids and Ammonoids'

The morphology and evolution of the nautiloids and ammonoids are compared. Additionally, differences in ammonoid suture types and possible functions of the complex ammonite sutures (septa) are discussed. Particular attention is given to extinctions and recoveries as well as the final extinction of the ammonites at the end of the Cretaceous. Photos of nautiloid and ammonoid specimens from the Triassic, Jurassic, and Cretaceous will be presented.


INFO ON JOHN CATALANI
John taught high school Earth Science for 32 years before retiring in 2004. From 1995 until it ceased publication in 2011, he authored the 'An Amateur’s Perspective' column for the newsletter magazine of the Paleontological Research Institution, American Paleontologist. John has several publications including one on Upper Mississippi Valley nautiloids and several with Robert Frey on Platteville Group Nautiloids. He has also presented many programs to clubs and at PaleoFest at the Burpee Museum in 2010. fossilnautiloid@aol.com;




3:00 p.m. Gerry Kloc: 'Silurian Trilobites from Missouri and Southern Illinois.'

There are many localities where Silurian trilobites are known. From Missouri and Southern Illinois, the literature is sparse on Silurian trilobites. There have been only 4 dalmanitid trilobites described from poorly preserved pygidia. The search for these described trilobites has resulted in many other trilobites that have not been reported from this area. Many of these trilobites will be shown, including some unusual ones.


INFO ON GERALD KLOC
Gerry is employed by the University of Rochester in the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences as a Geological Technician. He is known for his fossil preparation, especially trilobites. Gerry has searched for trilobites that have not been reported and/or known species of poor quality. They are prepared and made available to researchers to publish. gjkloc@yahoo.com







The keynote presentation will take place at the Clarion Hotel (AKA The Highlander) at 6:00PM



The keynote speaker will be Margaret Fraiser from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee - her keynote talk title is:

'Earth's Largest Extinction and Life's Recovery'


The Earth experienced the largest drop in biodiversity at the end of the Permian Period. The precise cause of this mass extinction remains controversial, but evidence is accumulating for strong global warming, possibly by as much as 15 degrees C, and for high levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and oceans. Evidence suggests that ecological devastation following the Permo-Triassic mass extinction was very long and may have lasted 5 million years. I will present some fossil data on the restructuring of life following the Permo-Triassic extinction.






Schedule of events for Saturday, April 7th, 2018:
Show hours: 8AM - 5PM


ADMISSION: The show and all events are free and open to the public, however donations are accepted. Children must be supervised.
SPECIAL EXHIBITS: 'Scorpy's Story' - the discovery of Pentecopteris decorahensis, a giant eurypterid from Winneshiek County, Iowa, featuring a life-size, 6-foot long model of the oldest-known sea scorpion and world's first big predator!
OTHER ACTIVITIES:
Silent Auctions.
Children's Fossil Dig Box.




Workshop talks: All at the Sharpless Auctions Facility


9:15 a.m. John Moffitt: 'Trilobites I Have Known'

Let's take a visual tour around an extinct class of arthropods that lasted from about 540 million years ago, up to 240 million years ago. You will discover that trilobites have become fine art in the 21st Century. John Moffitt will share over 45 years of experience in collecting, preparing, field trips, trading, having fun with and speaking about trilobites. Many years of collecting, stunning photographs, and some amazing trilobite art - it promises to be a wild ride. Fasten your seat belts!


INFO ON JOHN MOFFITT:

John Moffitt is an Astrophysicist, Earth Scientist and Computer Scientist. He's worked in the oil business for over 45 years as a geologist, geophysicist, palaeontologist, petrophysicist, exploration manager and currently works with companies developing large hardware/software projects. A past International Director for Toastmasters, John's presented at conferences, universities and museums. Also a musician, cartoonist, and playwright; John leads paleontological field trips worldwide and writes frequently in the sciences. A long time volunteer at the Houston Museum of Natural Sciences, John was inducted into the National Rockhound Hall of Fame in 2002 for working with children in the Earth Sciences. jmoffitt.hou@gmail.com 713-478-4555;




10:30 a.m. Rick Strapple: 'The Fauna and Flora of the Permian Period.'

We will briefly cover: Paleogeography and Topography of land masses and the climate of the Permian period. A comprehensive overview of vertebrate & invertebrate animals and plant species that dominated the Earth during the Permian. Discussion of how the Permian began 299 mya as the 'age of the amphibians,' and ended 251 mya with a mass extinction that saw the elimination of 96% of marine species, 70% of terrestrial vertebrates and 83% of insect genera.


INFO ON RICK STRAPPLE
My interests in Natural history began 61 years ago when visiting the academy of Natural Sciences in Philadelphia. It was there that I met Dr. Horace G.Richards, curator of Paleontology & Professor of Geology at the University of Pennsylvania. After receiving my undergraduate degree in Chemistry and working as a formulating chemist I devoted my free time to field collecting, lecturing and writing technical articles on Paleontology & Mineralogy. My personal collection of fossils and rare minerals exceeds 11,000 specimens. I am an active member of the Michigan Mineralogical Society, The Dallas Paleontology Society, Friends Of Mineralogy (Midwest Chapter),PMA and STLE. In 2016 I started a consulting and lecture service, THE RARE EARTH Company, to educate schools, museums, libraries and clubs on the Earth Sciences. I am currently employed as the V.P. marketing & sales by a major manufacturer of chemical specialties for numerous markets. rickstrapple@charter.net



11:45 a.m. Charles Newsom: 'Stump The Experts- Bring your fossils to ID'

If I can't identify it, I will find someone who can. I will also give general tips in IDing your material.


INFO ON CHARLES NEWSOM
Charles Newsom is an Emeritus Faculty in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Iowa. He is also a Research Fellow with the Non-Vertebrate Paleontology Laboratory of the Jackson School of Geosciences at the University of Texas, an avid fossil collector and is currently living in central Texas. He is collaborating with several paleontologists on a number of paleontological studies.He is now volunteering at the "Berry Springs Park and Preserve" in Georgetown where he has created a series of nature web galleries (flowers, butterflies, mushrooms, dragonflies, etc) for the park. Charles-newsom@uiowa.edu




12:30 p.m. Dan Cooper: 'Ordovician Trilobites of the US'
Ordovician trilobites have a unique position in the fossil record. In most cases they are found in strata that has not gone through the geological processes that have distorted and compressed the majority of Cambrian trilobites, but are found in larger quantities and higher diversity than specimen found in later periods. I will cover the major groups of Ordovician trilobites with discussions on several historic locations.


INFO ON DAN COOPER
Dan Cooper was born and in raised in the greater Cincinnati area that allowed access to the excellent collecting locations of the Cincinnatian strata. Applying many of the techniques and experiences from his profession as an Aerospace Engineer, he has successfully collected, donated, and contributed scientifically to the science of trilobites. He has co-authored several scientific publications and has donated thousands of specimen to universities, museums and other scientific institutes. He has collected over 20,000 trilobites from his Mt. Orab, Ohio property purchased in 1982. He along with Tom Whiteley also rediscovered the famous soft body Triarthus collected in the late 19th century and assisted the American Museum of natural History and the Smithsonian in adding thousands of specimen to their collections.




1:45 p.m. Tiffany Adrain : '160 years of Crinoid Collecting in Iowa'
The University of Iowa Paleontology Repository is home to over 1 million fossils from all geological ages and with worldwide coverage. A large part of this collection is more than 50,000 crinoid specimens collected over the last 160 years by UI researchers and well-known Iowa amateur palaeontologists including Frank Springer, Bernice Beane, Christina Strimple, Calvin Levorson, Arthur Gerk, Amel Priest, and Glenn Crossman. Discover more about their contributions to paleontology, and the history of the UI crinoid collection.


INFO ON TIFFANY ADRAIN:
Tiffany Adrain is the Collections Manager at the University of Iowa Paleontology Repository in the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences. tiffany-adrain@uiowa.edu 319-335-1822




3:00 p.m. Bill Desmarais: 'Track'em down and Dig'em up'

Alberta, Canada is a known hot bed of dinosaur discoveries and fossils. Come on this virtual expedition and find thousands of dinosaur tracks and trackways uncovered in a large coal mine in the Canadian Rockies. The expedition continues with discoveries of multiple Albertosaurus skeletons in the badlands of the Red Deer River that hint at the pack hunting nature of large tyrannosaurs. There will be interactive parts where you will be able to apply your paleontologist skills and observe real dinosaur fossils and footprints. Children are welcome.


INFO ON BILL DESMARAIS
Bill Desmarais was a high school science teacher in Iowa for 36 years before his retirement in 2007. He taught biology, earth sciences, and Advanced Placement Environmental Science at Washington High School in Cedar Rapids. Since 1982 he has had the good fortune to work with Dr. Phil Currie of the University of Alberta at Edmonton and Pete Larson of the Black Hills Institute, Hill City, South Dakota at several dinosaur quarries in South Dakota, Wyoming and several locations in Alberta, Canada. Bill is a member of the Iowa Academy of Science and the Cedar Valley Rock and Minerals Society, as well as the Mid-America Paleontological Society. Desmarais_3@msn.com



5:15 p.m. LIVE AUCTION - OPEN TO THE PUBLIC:

Approximately 80 fossils and fossil-related items will be auctioned. Special Auction Item: Dinosaur Dig Trip, offered by Paleo Prospectors, to South Dakota, Wyoming or North Dakota for the summer of 2019. Minimum bid has yet to be determined. Keep almost everything you find (up to $4000). Pick from three week-long sessions in June or July. More information on the trip can be found at http://www.paleoprospectors.com. Proxy bids may be emailed to EXPO chair Tom Williams: paleotom234@comcast.net.

Proceeds from the auction are used to support paleontology scholarships.









Schedule of events for Sunday, April 8th, 2018:
Show hours: 8AM - 3PM (limited dealers)


ADMISSION: The show and all events are free and open to the public, however donations are accepted. Children must be supervised.
SPECIAL EXHIBITS: 'Scorpy's Story' - the discovery of Pentecopteris decorahensis, a giant eurypterid from Winneshiek County, Iowa, featuring a life-size, 6-foot long model of the oldest-known sea scorpion and world's first big predator!
OTHER ACTIVITIES:
Silent Auctions.
Children's Fossil Dig Box.


Workshop talk:
1:00 p.m. Don Johnson: 'Dinosaur Origins in the Triassic'
When the first dinosaurs appeared during the Triassic Period, they were minor players among other land vertebrates including other archosaurs and therapsids. By the close of the Triassic, dinosaurs had begun a period of dominance over all other land animals that lasted over 150 million years. What were the first dinosaurs like, and what led to their dominance? Was it chance, or special adaptations, or both? What does the latest research say about their early evolution? Where is further research needed? Bring your own questions about the early days of the dinosaurs!


INFO ON DON 'FOSSIL GUY' JOHNSON
Don is an amateur paleontologist from Iowa City, IA with a special interest in fossil vertebrates. His collection of fossils and fossil replicas is one of the largest in Iowa, and he has experience collecting fossils in Iowa and other states out West. Using his self-given nickname 'The Fossil Guy', he has taught hundreds of educational programs using items from his collection. Don is President of the Eastern Iowa Paleontology Project (EIPP) - a non-profit with the purpose of establishing exhibits and promoting science education through the wonder of paleontology. He can be contacted at 319-213-1390 or donjohnson0511@gmail.com. To learn more about the EIPP, visit www.paleoproject.org.





January 2018 MAPS Newsletter Now Available


     
Click on the link below - no password required!

January-March 2018 Newsletter



Newsletters from 2015-2017 Available Below



     
Click on the link(s) below - no password required!

MAPS Expo 2018 Informational Newsletter

May-August 2017 MAPS Newsletter

Jan-March 2017 MAPS Newsletter

MAPS EXPO 2017 Informational Newsletter

May-Aug 2016 Newsletter

May-Aug 2016 Newsletter

Jan-Mar 2016 Newsletter

MAPS Expo 2016 information


Sept-Nov 2015 MAPS Digest Newsletter

May-Aug 2015 MAPS Digest Newsletter

Jan-Mar 2015 MAPS Digest Newsletter

MAPS EXPO 2015 Info Digest Newsletter



Click here to view previous years' archived news.